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Last FridayIvan Sprajc led a group of researchers to a site in Campeche, a province in the western Yucatán peninsula, that he initially identified via stereoscopic aerial photographs. He and his group found the ruins of an enormous 54 acre (22 hectares) city, full of artifacts.

Archaeologist Ivan Sprajc led an international team of experts to study the Maya site. CREDIT: National Institute of Anthropology and History

Archaeologist Ivan Sprajc led an international team of experts to study the Maya site.
CREDIT: National Institute of Anthropology and History

The city is named Chactún. Chactún was occupied during the Late Classic Maya period, which spans roughly A.D. 600 until A.D. 900. Some interesting finds include three monumental complexes with the remains of pyramids — one 75 feet (23 meters) high. In addition, they’ve identified ball courts, plazas, homes, altars, bits of painted stucco and stone slabs known as stele. One stele refers to an apparent ruler named K’inich B’ahlam.

This image is from the southeast complex at the newfound Maya city called Chactún. CREDIT: National Institute of Anthropology and History

This image is from the southeast complex at the newfound Maya city called Chactún.
CREDIT: National Institute of Anthropology and History

Unlike other large Mayan cities, Chactún has never been studied by archaeologists before. I’m eager to see what comes from this city, and what insights it provides. Other interesting methods to find archaeological sites have been used in the past, which I’ve written about here, here and here.

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