How ‘Junk DNA’ Can Impact Evolvability

Many have written how the term 'junk DNA' is an imperfect one, and how junk DNA may have a tangential role in evolutionary changes. A new study published in Science visits this topic, specifically focusing on repetitive non-coding sequences in and around promoter regions of the human genome. The authors of this study have published... Continue Reading →

Mice With Humanized FOXP2 Have Longer Neurons, Vocalize Differently…

FOXP2 is one of my favorite genes. I studied it extensively while getting my Master's degree and wrote about it several times on Anthropology.net. For those that do not know much about it, I'll quickly introduce it. FOXP2 is a transcription factor gene, which means it controls the expression and regulation of many other genes.... Continue Reading →

Oldest Evidence Of Leprosy Found In India

I've successfully completed my first term of medical school, and realized I have a lot of free time so I've decided to pick up blogging during my short summer break in order to prevent brain rot. Today, I noticed an interesting anthropology-medicine news bit pass by my RSS reader and wanted to share it with... Continue Reading →

The Face Of The First European

The face of the first European, reconstructed by forensic artist Richard Neave. Photo from Telegraph. Using the incomplete skull and jaw bone in a cave in the southwest of the Carpathian Mountains in Romania, scientists had revealed for the first time the face of the first European. Scientists doesn't know if this modern human is... Continue Reading →

Garden of Eden: The Origin Of Modern Humans

A new genetic survey by Dr. Sarah A. Tishkoff of the University of Pennsylvania and her team has found that modern humans originated in an area between Namibia and Angola, on the coast of southwest Africa. Read the New York Times Article: Eden? Maybe. But Where’s the Apple Tree? However, this harsh and inhospitable area... Continue Reading →

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