The Role of Climate Change on Early Human Society & Creativity in Kenya’s Olorgesailie Basin

  Based on the following three recently published Science studies, in order to survive the climate chances 320,000 ago, early humans in East Africa created complex tools, traded and maybe even developed symbolic language. Chronology of the Acheulean to Middle Stone Age transition in eastern Africa Long-distance stone transport and pigment use in the earliest... Continue Reading →

Breaking Down Sranan Tongo To Understand Linguistic & Cultural Heritage

Creole languages are unique. They are a hodgepodge of languages which arise in situations where people exist without a shared common language. People end up using bits of different languages. Over generations, these admixed languages become fully fledged natural human languages, known as creoles. André Sherriah and Hubert Devonish, two linguists at the University of... Continue Reading →

Ian Towle of John Moores University and colleagues published an interesting paper in the International Journal of Paleopathology that illuminates early hominins had similar dental issues as we do now. Dental erosion from brushing too vigorously as well as fizzy drinks, fruit juice, wine, and other acidic food and drink can leave shallow, shiny, lesions... Continue Reading →

How Was The Pacific Settled?

Two different studies in in Nature Ecology & Evolution and Current Biology looked at the genetic variation of people inhabiting Vanuatu to help answer the question when did humans settle the Pacific, likely the last region on Earth to be occupied by us. Lead author of the study in Current Biology, David Reich, from Harvard Medical School,... Continue Reading →

Linking Early Human Language & Cave Art

Human language is thought to emerge around 100,000 years ago as an abstract symbolic system. It is very likely that humans spoke long before it they wrote. Because the nature of language is largely spoken, it has been hard to find physical evidence of when and how humans began speaking...  Some argue early evidence of... Continue Reading →

World’s Oldest Cave Art Made By Neanderthals

In two new studies, published yesterday in Science and Science Advances, researchers Alistair Pike, an archaeologist at the University of Southampton, João Zilhão, a University of Barcelona archaeologist and Dirk Hoffmann, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology who specializes in dating minerals lay out the case that 65,000 year old murals and 115,000 year old... Continue Reading →

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