5,700 Year Old Chewing Gum Reveals Insights On Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Life in Denmark

Theis Jensen, a bioarchaeologist at the University of Copenhagen, and colleagues, published a report in Nature Communications about a the finding of a South Danish Neolithic woman’s complete genome and oral microbiome from a piece of birch tar she chewed. This isn't the first time this was line of evidence was used, nor the oldest,... Continue Reading →

A 43,900-year-old Cave Painting in Sulawesi, Indonesia is the Oldest Hunting Story Depicted

Archaeologist Maxime Aubert, from Griffith University and his colleagues have published, in Nature, the discovery of the oldest depicted hunting story. The cave painting is thought to be 43,900 years old. It was made by prehistoric people on the island of Sulawesi. The painting is about 4.5 meter or 14.8 feet in length and about... Continue Reading →

Apidima 1 – A New Look At Old Skull

In the 1970's, the Apidima Cave site in Greece was excavated by archaeologists. Lodged within a chunk of rock was the Apidima 1 specimen. It was found adjacent to a distorted 170,000 year old Neanderthal skull called Apidima 2. In the image below you can see how close in proximity the two specimens were discovered.... Continue Reading →

Seven Million Years of Human Evolution

This fascinating visual presentation from the American Museum of Natural History outlines what we know about human evolution by combining a timeline, a map, animation, photographs, and artistic representations of various hominins.

How did the Eastern Island Maoi Get 13-Ton Hats

One of my interests in the peopling of the Americas are the Easter Island maoi statues made by the Rapanui people. I've posted before about how they were moved. As if the moai themselves weren't impressive enough, a new paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science looks at how this preindustrial society put 13-ton hats or... Continue Reading →

A new paper in Nature Communications documents a strange bottleneck event occurring about 7,000 years ago, where the genetic diversity of the Y chromosome completely collapsed leaving about one male to 17 females. We all know the agricultural revolution happened around 12,000 years ago. Societies grew in size and many organized around patrilineal kinships. Turning... Continue Reading →

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