Engare Sero in Northern Tanzania Yield Largest Collection of Prehistoric Human Footprints in Africa

This volcano in East Africa, called Ol Doinyo Lengai, erupted long ago and produced a mudflow that preserved the biggest collection of ancient human footprints (some shown in the foreground) found in Africa so far. Cynthia Liutkus-Pierce Just south of Lake Natron, in northern Tanzania is the Engare Sero site which was was originally discovered... Continue Reading →

The Oldest European Homo sapiens

Excavations at Bacho Kiro Cave, in Bulgaria Last week Jean-Jacques Hublin, director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Helen Fewlass who is also at MPI, and their colleagues published in the journals Nature and Nature Ecology & Evolution reports of their findings in the Bacho Kiro cave site in Bulgaria. They have... Continue Reading →

The Last Homo erectus

Last week, in Nature, University of Iowa anthropologist Russell Ciochon and colleagues published new dates on fossils and sediment layers from a site called Ngandong that originally yielded a dozen or so Homo erectus skulls in the 1930's. Using uranium-series dating on some newly excavated mammalian remains from the same sediment layer as the Homo erectus skulls,... Continue Reading →

Apidima 1 – A New Look At Old Skull

In the 1970's, the Apidima Cave site in Greece was excavated by archaeologists. Lodged within a chunk of rock was the Apidima 1 specimen. It was found adjacent to a distorted 170,000 year old Neanderthal skull called Apidima 2. In the image below you can see how close in proximity the two specimens were discovered.... Continue Reading →

Seven Million Years of Human Evolution

This fascinating visual presentation from the American Museum of Natural History outlines what we know about human evolution by combining a timeline, a map, animation, photographs, and artistic representations of various hominins.

How did the Eastern Island Maoi Get 13-Ton Hats

One of my interests in the peopling of the Americas are the Easter Island maoi statues made by the Rapanui people. I've posted before about how they were moved. As if the moai themselves weren't impressive enough, a new paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science looks at how this preindustrial society put 13-ton hats or... Continue Reading →

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