World’s Oldest Cave Art Made By Neanderthals

In two new studies, published yesterday in Science and Science Advances, researchers Alistair Pike, an archaeologist at the University of Southampton, João Zilhão, a University of Barcelona archaeologist and Dirk Hoffmann, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology who specializes in dating minerals lay out the case that 65,000 year old murals and 115,000 year old... Continue Reading →

Richard Coss Argues Neanderthals Didn’t Make Art Because They Were Inferior Hunters

In an article recently published in the journal Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, Richard Coss, a professor emeritus of psychology, questions why there isn't Neanderthal art in the archaeological record. He seems to skip the obvious, i.e. that is it hasn't been found yet, and jumps to the conclusion that Homo sapiens has superior hand... Continue Reading →

A team of French geologists and paleontologists and led by Jean-Michel Geneste, published in PLoS One that they believe that they have identified the oldest known images of erupting volcanoes, daubed in red and white pigments over other cave paintings in south-eastern France cave site, Chauvet, around 36,000 years ago. The curiously abstract images were first found... Continue Reading →

Krapina Neandertals may have manipulated white-tailed eagle talons to make jewelry 130,000 years ago, before the appearance of modern human in Europe, according to a study published March 11, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Frayer from University of Kansas and colleagues from Croatia.

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