5,700 Year Old Chewing Gum Reveals Insights On Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Life in Denmark

Theis Jensen, a bioarchaeologist at the University of Copenhagen, and colleagues, published a report in Nature Communications about a the finding of a South Danish Neolithic woman’s complete genome and oral microbiome from a piece of birch tar she chewed. This isn't the first time this was line of evidence was used, nor the oldest,... Continue Reading →

An Arab in Roman Iron-Age Denmark

Ancient mtDNA from 22 individuals from two sites in Southern Denmark have been isolated, sequenced and analyzed. The two sites are Bøgebjerggård and Skovgaarde. On the map to your right, they are marked as B for Bøgebjerggård and S for Skovgaarde. They date to the Danish Roman Iron-Age period, or approximately 2000 to 1600 years... Continue Reading →

Recovering 1,000 Year Old Viking mtDNA

Today's big anthropological headline is based upon this brand new open access PLoS One paper, "Evidence of Authentic DNA from Danish Viking Age Skeletons Untouched by Humans for 1,000 Years." The paper is written well, has lots of controls, and establishes some protocols on how to recovery ancient DNA. Despite these good things, I think... Continue Reading →

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