Ian Towle of John Moores University and colleagues published an interesting paper in the International Journal of Paleopathology that illuminates early hominins had similar dental issues as we do now. Dental erosion from brushing too vigorously as well as fizzy drinks, fruit juice, wine, and other acidic food and drink can leave shallow, shiny, lesions... Continue Reading →

The Cardiac Health of the Tsimane

A lot of discussion is constantly had about what is the healthiest diet; low fat or low carb. An interesting study was published in the Lancet recently where anthropologists teamed with cardiologists to study cardiac health of Amazon's Tsimane. The Tsimane are Bolivian. They live off and around the Maniqui River located in the Amazon... Continue Reading →

Why Do Women Have More Cavities?

Razib has chimed in on the latest piece of research to come from John Lukacs, "Fertility and Agriculture Accentuate Sex Differences in Dental Caries Rates," published in Current Anthropology. Throughout time, women have had more cavities on average than men. I've explained how cavities are formed in a previous post.  Diet change and sexual division... Continue Reading →

Zooarchaeological Analysis Of Animal Remains From Vanguard & Gorham’s Caves In Gibraltar

Zooarchaeology is an anthropological sub-discipline which focuses on studying animal remains from archaeological sites. Animal remains can tell us a lot of about prehistoric peoples' diets and behavioral tendencies as well as the ecological makeup of the area. A new PNAS paper investigates the zooarchaeological record of two Neandertal sites in Gibraltar, Vanguard and Gorham's... Continue Reading →

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