Ancient DNA from France Outline Complex Interactions Between Mesolithic Hunter-gatherers & Neolithic Farmers

About 12,000 years ago in the Near East, the emergency of farming, animal domestication and subsequent changes to prehistoric human lifestyles emerged. This is known as the Neolithic revolution. This culture spread through Europe, along the Danube and the Mediterranean coasts by 5,000 to 4,500 years ago. Little was known about how the carriers of... Continue Reading →

The Oldest European Homo sapiens

Excavations at Bacho Kiro Cave, in Bulgaria Last week Jean-Jacques Hublin, director at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Helen Fewlass who is also at MPI, and their colleagues published in the journals Nature and Nature Ecology & Evolution reports of their findings in the Bacho Kiro cave site in Bulgaria. They have... Continue Reading →

Decoding The Origins Of Ötzi’s Gut Flora

In Science this week, researchers have reported they have reconstructed the entire genome of the H. pylori that lived in Ötzi's gut and the results give us an interesting picture into the peopling of Europe approximately 5,000 years ago. Most H. pylori lives harmlessly in our stomachs. Sometimes this bug can cause ulcers and stomach cancer.... Continue Reading →

Kostenki 14 – A 36,000 Year Old European

Just what makes a European? European genetic ancestry used to seem straightforward and in general is now understood as an admixture of three sources; indigenous European hunter-gatherers from 42,00 to 45,000 ago, Middle Easterners from the agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago, and Central Asians who charged through Europe in the last 4,000 to 5,000 years. Last month,... Continue Reading →

A WordPress.com Website.

Up ↑