New Archaeological Evidence of the First Americans to 33,000 Years Ago

Two new papers published in Nature, document the findings from the Chiquihuite Cave site in central Mexico. Artifacts from the site ere first discovered in 2010, but there were difficulties traveling to and from the site. For that reason, archaeologists lived for 80 days between '16 and '17. They excavated over 1,900 stone tools. The... Continue Reading →

Polynesians Contacted Native Americans Long Before European Contact

We've had some ideas that prehistoric Polynesian expansions made contact with Native Americans before European contact. For example, the sweet potato, a staple of Polynesian diets for hundreds of years, made its way to Andean culture where it was domesticated. And we've identified that some current Rapa Nui people have Native American DNA dating back... Continue Reading →

A Russian Ancestor to Native Americans

Russian archaeologists in 1976 excavating the Ust’-Kyakhta-3 site on the banks of the Selenga River A. P. Okladnikov During the 1970's, a site called Ust-Kyakhta found between the Mongolian borders and the southern banks of the Lake Baikal, was excavated. The Russian team unearthed many stone and bone tools as well as ceramics, and reindeer... Continue Reading →

My first understanding of Cahokia and pre-Columbian cities of the Americas came from the book 1491. Between 1050 and 1200 A.D., Cahokia was North America's largest and most prominent cultural center north of Mexico. It wielded economic power and religious influence from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. A new paper published in... Continue Reading →

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