Thank Your Neandertals & Denisovans For Your Allergies

Two new papers in the American Journal of Human Genetics document how we should thank archaic humans like Neandertals and Denisovans for our allergies and boosted immune systems. Both studies highlight the functional importance of three inherited of Toll-like receptor genes; TLR1, TLR6, and TLR10. These toll like receptors respond to antigens from bacteria, fungi, and parasites and... Continue Reading →

Out of Africa’s Mutational Marks

There are many different processes that alter allele frequencies. The most commonly understood concept is Natural Selection. But others such as drift and Founder effects also play an evolutionary role. This is seen in the Out of Africa model of human evolution. As modern humans branched out of Africa and into footholds in Asia and... Continue Reading →

Many cultures existed in Europe about 40-45,000 years ago. About 42,000 years ago, in southern Europe, the Protoaurignacian developed and the culture that followed marked a turning point in modern humanity. They made the earliest instruments, the earliest art, and possibly the first representation of a human figure. It has been hard to conclusively prove that the Protoaurignacians... Continue Reading →

A study published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology has for the first time analysed the fragments of three individuals found between '67 and '80 at the French site, Marillac, dating back 57,600 years ago. These are an incomplete diaphysis of a right radius, another of a left fibula and the majority of a right... Continue Reading →

Penghu 1 is a mandible with an interesting discovery; Taiwanese fishermen dredged up the jawbone off the coast of Penghu Channel. The fishermen sold it to a local antique shop, where collector Kun-Yu Tsai purchased and donated it to his collection to the National Museum of Natural Science in Taiwan. Tentative dates on this specimen... Continue Reading →

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